collective-admin, Author at

collective-admin, Author at

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September 18, 2023by collective-admin

 

 

1 intention

60 coaches

120 coachees 

S$20,000 raised for the Bone Marrow Donor Program 

Look at what community can do when we come together. 

Collective Change Institute’s Coaching for Change program matches coaches with members of the public who are keen to experience breakthroughs in their lives. Coachees don’t pay these coaches for the coaching directly. Instead, they pay it forward to CCI’s charity of choice. 

Within 3 years, the C4C program raised $20k for the Bone Marrow Donor Program, the only bone marrow registry in Singapore that helps recruit and match donors with patients whose lives depend on a bone marrow match. These funds sponsor the operational costs needed to add another 111 donors to the registry.

The Charity-Coach-Coachee Triple Win

The Bone Marrow Donor program does important work. Every day 6 Singaporeans are diagnosed with a blood-related disease. For some patients, a bone marrow transplant is often their last chance of survival. A bone marrow transplant involves the infusion of healthy blood stem cells into the patient’s body to stimulate new bone marrow growth and restore production of healthy blood cells. The chances of a match is highly dependent on ethnicity. The team is driven by the charity’s mission of finding a donor for every patient. To get more people to sign up as a potential marrow donor, BMDP drives awareness, recruitment, swab processing, donor engagement, public relations, stakeholder communication and fundraising activities. All it takes is a simple cheek swab. The swabs are then sent to a laboratory to identify one’s Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) typing, before he/she is included into our register of potential marrow donors.

“We are thrilled to be able to do our part of society through the Coaching for Change program. We came up with this program to address a fundamental challenge all aspiring coaches face – putting themselves out there to start getting life coaching clients in” 

CCI leverages their reputation, network and resources to fund this program such that our coaches can start working with coachees. “It doesn’t matter if they are still in training. It has shown over and again that a positive impact happens as long as the coach is passionate and equipped with fundamental coaching know-how. We are so proud that simply through conversations, we get to impact many, many lives beyond our immediate circle,” says Lin Tan, Director of Training of CCI.

What drives CCI?

CCI’s mission is to create ripples of change. Inspired by Mother Theresa’s quote:

The #changecatalysts who undergo CCI’s Professional Coach Development program emerge after 6 months of intensive coach training and personal development confident and ready to take on paid life and executive coaching clients. The Coaching for Change program takes place during these 6 months, and many coaches attribute a fantastic training journey to this flagship program – the one-and-only in Singapore – that brings them through a real-life experience of getting engaged by actual clients. 

“We are dedicated to walking the talk. Impact doesn’t only happen after coach training, or after obtaining a ‘coach’ title. We are here to create impact, and we do it by opening avenues for our coaches – wherever they are at in their journey – to start working their magic with real clients.” Director of Talent, Lim Pei Ying shares that coaches who experience the difference they make with clients right from the start sets them up for success as they continue pursuing their professional credentials. 

It’s not always a bed of roses

The bigger the goal, the bigger the challenges. Since the launch of the CCI’s Coaching for Change program in 2017, hundreds of coaches have contributed to the success of the program. The donations from the first 2 years were used to fund the building of haze shelters in Indonesia (through partnering with Big Red Button) when the haze reached critical levels over 2016-2019. Every few years, CCI appoints a new beneficiary and after a destined encounter with BMDP over the radio, CCI decided to play a part in raising awareness of this worthy cause. 

It is not easy to coordinate hundreds of coaches, who are empowered to conduct these life coaching sessions at their own pace and time with their clients. Ensuring donations come in requires a strong compliance in the administration and tracking system. That’s when a dedicated coaching manager joined the CCI team to oversee the success of the program. Terence Eng brings his corporate expertise into the development and management of the processes. What keeps him going despite having to juggle managing the C4C program with his full-time job? “I get to witness first hand how the coaches grow in their craft, and am fueled by the inspiring testimonials from our coachees as they go thru the C4C program. Running the program gives me so much more meaning knowing that it is for a charitable cause , a life saving one. Contributing in a small way to impact so many lives, makes all my efforts running the C4C program such a rewarding one.” 

Still, it’s processes arn’t the only factor. The charity conversation need to be kept alive throughout the coahcing journey, which spans 4-6 months. Coaches focus entirely on the success of the coachee, and the coachee is not ready to pay it forward until the end of the coaching. More emphasis on the charity portion might help, alongside a stronger spotlight on the beneficiary so that the larger ‘WHY’ leads the way.

What lies ahead?

Eugene Sim, Director of Partnerships says, “We are here to play the impact game. CCI will continue our efforts to deliver world-class coach training programs that produce world-class coaches. Imagine what happens when individuals with the right heart are equipped to conduct life-changing conversations? That vision drives us and with the support of our community and our team, we lead the way as a coaching community in Asia dedicated to making a lasting difference to society.”


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Introduction

Covid slammed into the world like a hurricane, wreaking havoc on all areas of the economy and forcing businesses to make split-second decisions owing to the lockdown’s negative consequences.

It accelerated digital transformation, automation and normalized hybrid/remote work, putting businesses at the edge of a precipice tipping into a new future that demands employees to reskill and change core skills.

Aside from that, business leaders have had to cope with this new generation of workers (GEN-Zs) constantly battling with their value-driven approach towards their careers and tendency to challenge the status quo in diversity, equity, and inclusion.

The Gen-Z attitude toward work has made it difficult to maneuver and solve problems using traditional means because of the pandemic, the riskiness associated with climate crises, and natural resource depletion, which have also become a source of concern for investors.

As a result of these challenges, business leaders in charge of making decisions that will either propel or stifle their companies’ growth must equip themselves with the essential qualities required to stay afloat in the future of work in this volatile, complex, and uncertain environment.

What are the top 4 qualities of leaders in the future of work?

While there is a bucket list of qualities leaders in the future of work should possess to thrive and increase employee retention, these four qualities mentioned below are the most essential:

  • Adaptability 
  • Humility
  • Communication 
  • Nurturing skills.

Leaders who lack these qualities will find it difficult to survive the hurdles that come in the fast-paced business world, especially when dealing with Gen-Zs as the workforce, who, unlike the previous generations, are more revolutionary and rarely joke about their demands from employers.

1. Adaptability

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As the pandemic continues to spread with no end in sight, business leaders must begin planning because it is nearly impossible to predict what skills will be required to thrive in the future of work, so organizations and employees must be prepared to adapt, with leaders leading the way.

Adaptability means accepting change and exploring the market with an open mind to produce new ideas and contingency plans.

A company leader’s capacity to adapt will keep them ahead of the ever-changing trends in the work environment.

A good example is the inflow of virtual classrooms and apps that gained popularity among students and professors during the covid outbreak.

Amid the COVID -19 epidemic, these apps and virtual events are a game-changing invention, and businesses who have adapted to this sort of online event meetings have survived. In contrast, other traditional firms may have failed.

To successfully navigate their organizations through change, leaders must remain nimble and adapt on the go.

Employees should be encouraged and rewarded for reskilling and adapting the key skills required to stay in business.

A real-life example of what happens when a leader is not adaptable is the Yahoo! incident. Yahoo!, a previously striving company with a market value estimated at $125Billion in 2000, experienced a fall that serves as a big lesson in the business world.

Yahoo! did not adapt to the shift in the new internet trends and preferred to stick to the conventional methods of using non-mobile-friendly websites despite employees having suggested that they move with the trend. Remember that mobile phones of the past did not have the “desktop site” feature, and the Yahoo website had issues loading on small screens, so it was challenging for users to access their services.

The downfall of Yahoo! proves that leaders should be open to adapting to consumer needs and make decisions that support the business in keeping current.

2. Humility

Another key quality for company executives who want to succeed in the future of work is humility.

Humility is thinking less about yourself and more about bringing forth the best in your colleagues. That involves shifting from a know-it-all to a learn-it-all mindset.

In a 2021 survey of employee performance in three advertising agencies in Africa, employees who were allowed to share their perspectives and be creative with solutions came up with some of the most innovative ideas that pushed agencies to new heights.

Business leaders must be willing to actively listen and learn and ask compelling questions to inspire creativity and innovation, which will allow for experimentation, resulting in new discoveries and inventions.

Know-it-all leaders focus on their expertise to generate solutions and are less open to constructive feedback or further dialogue. In contrast, humble leaders take responsibility when things go wrong, admitting their mistakes with a willingness to learn from them and recognizing better ideas from others.

This quality discloses their flaws, which creates a psychologically secure environment for employees to be themselves, express their opinions and ideas freely, and learn from their mistakes.

Humility as a personality trait leads to increased collaboration, engagement, and innovation, all of which contribute to long-term organizational success.

3. Communication

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A study by Economist Intelligence Unit published in the HBR article confirms that ineffective workplace communication costs big companies approximately $64 million yearly. This enormous loss was a result of failure to finish projects, high-stress levels, low morale,  and missed performance objectives, mostly on the part of employees.

As the pandemic persists, leaders need to improve their communication skills because communication was identified as the number one shortcoming in most firms during an employee engagement survey.

The only approach to achieve a smooth transition when environmental and economic conditions are rapidly changing is to communicate properly.

Leaders must bridge the gap and hopefully recoup the loss incurred as a result of poor communication because the purpose of communication is to align workers with the business strategic goals and culture and sustain employee engagement to foster collaboration and teamwork required to flourish as a company.

It’s also important to note that the influence of successful communication keeps increasing with the younger generation (Gen Z), who value proactive communication, transparency, and a sense of belonging at work.

Especially because we now enable remote work, the importance of excellent communication cannot be overemphasised.

At the end of the day, if you want to increase employee retention rates in the long run, employees must feel included and associated with the organisation’s goal.

4. Nurturing

In the future, unlimited business growth will be mostly based on one main trait: NURTURING.

Leaders who see workers as the company’s growth potential agree that treating employees with respect and empathy is critical to realizing and developing their full potential.

The journey to developing excellent workers begins with taking the time to understand their professional goals and explore how they might be linked with the strategic goals of the company to produce a win-win situation for both employees and the company.

Leaders can help workers achieve their professional goals by offering them more responsibility and job rotations and allowing them the freedom to innovate, take chances, and disrupt the status quo while still keeping them accountable.

Nurturing also entails pushing people to go beyond their present capabilities to demonstrate what they are capable of, supporting and mentoring them along the way while allowing them to fail and learn valuable lessons, and praising them when they succeed.

When you help workers grow and develop into leaders, you are increasing employee engagement and retention while also actively planning for your company’s future.

CONCLUSION

Leaders who can adapt, are humble enough to admit their mistakes, listen to suggestions from subordinates, communicate effectively instead of barking orders, and nurture their employees to their full potential are more likely to survive in the future of work than leaders who do not possess these qualities.

A good question to ask yourself as a business leader who intends to succeed in the future of work is, ‘How am I integrating these four essential qualities into how I carry and present myself to my team, and how can I improve on the areas that need improvement?’

Leaders who can adapt, are humble enough to admit their mistakes, listen to suggestions from subordinates, communicate effectively instead of barking orders, and nurture their employees to their full potential are more likely to survive in the future of work than leaders who do not possess these qualities.

A good question to ask yourself as a business leader who intends to succeed in the future of work is, ‘How am I integrating these four essential qualities into how I carry and present myself to my team, and how can I improve on the areas that need improvement?’


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January 5, 2022by collective-admin

You’re a trained coach, so why is your coaching impact a hit or a miss?

Coaching can be an extremely rewarding experience. Having the ability and expertise to help somebody reach their goal or get over a hurdle is not something that just anyone can do. It requires patience, knowledge, and years of training.

However, even the coaches with years of training may find themselves in a series of hits or misses. Sometimes, you may feel like you did amazing with your client and then have a session the next day that makes you feel like an imposter.

Sounds familiar?

Don’t worry, we’re here to get to know the reasons – and solutions – behind it.

The Reasons Behind The Misses

Firstly, step back and reflect on what you’re experiencing. You may be facing a case of self-doubt, and are not objectively acknowledging how you did. Are there hidden expectations you had of yourself you didn’t fulfil? Is there a mismatch between where the client landed vs what you wanted to see from the client?

Here, I am suggesting two instances which you can consider to redefine or refine your measures of success Read on below.

You judge your success by how you feel you did.

  • While feeling accomplished is a great feeling, it’s not a great measure of success. The same way that feeling like you failed doesn’t necessarily mean that you did. Coaching is a deeply personal profession but it’s best if you learn to detach your personal feelings from the outcome.
  • Remember that it’s all about your client. Projecting yourself and your feelings on their journey does the coaching partnership a great disservice. Every client is different. They have their own stories, needs, and personalities that greatly affect their journey to whatever goal they set. Every client should be treated with objectivity from start to end of each session. Seperate yourself from the client’s journey and process.

You might not have set clear coaching objectives.

  • Clear objectives help you and the client scope out the session’s purpose.
  • What some coaches tend to do is to go over sessions like a tightly created module. Human progress isn’t linear and coaching shouldn’t be standardized – again, every client is different. To make it your goal to “cover” everything, every session, is often not helpful to your client especially if they don’t get what they need from it. Coaching shouldn’t be too focused on getting to the “solution”, not when it sacrifices deeper discoveries and often, more important, discoveries for your client.
  • Remember, clients often don’t know what they want exactly, thus not really knowing how to measure the success of each of their coaching sessions. As their coach, it’s your job to provide guidance without leading them to the results that YOU secretly wish for.. It is their journey and you are their guide. Make sure that each session is defined by what’s important to them and allow a safe space for bouncing off their ideas that will slowly but surely lead to a clearer picture.

Now that you know what to look out for when determining the success or failure of a session, you might be wondering how to solve them.

We have a three-step solution you can follow and revisit when you need to.

The Three-Step Solution

Invest time in thoroughly defining with the client what would be meaningful for them to experience from the session, and invest time in yourself as a coach following these three steps.

  1. Focus on your client’s experience.Lift your eyes from your checklist and notes. focus beyond your client’s responses and pay closer attention to their experience. Your job as their coach is to present what could make a difference for them and to provide clarity to their jumbled thoughts.Best way to do this is to invest time in exploring what would be meaningful for them from this session – and why? Find out, where they specifically require your support, and what is the best form this support could take? This co-creation process helps you separate your personal wishes from what the client objectively needs from you, and the process to get them there. As a coach, learn to meet them where they are – not where you want them to be.

    At the end, ask how they feel after the session. Do they feel more confident about the next course of action? Do they feel lighter now that they have more clarity in their thoughts? What is the difference between when they first came in, and where they are now? What allowed that change?

  2. Give them time and space.It’s tempting to get immediate feedback after a session, but some things might take a while to sink in. Again, clients often don’t know what they want or need. As their coach, as much as it is your job to guide them, it is also your job to trust them and give them a safe space to unpack their thoughts in order to slowly reveal what they need.The best practice here is to co-create check-in points that would make sense for the client. Some clients prefer shorter feedback cycles, whilst some respect the process and prefer to flow with what comes up. Be clear what to expect, so that you don’t take ‘no feedback as bad feedback’; likewise if as a Coach, you need conclusive feedback, let them know and design that process with them.
  3. Reflect upon yourself.Now, as for you, the coach, you have your own innework to do. Similar to observing your client’s experience post-session, take time to absorb your own as well. Separate what was satisfying and effective for your client from what YOU ideally wish or intend to achieve as a coach. Notice if there’s a gap between the two and give yourself space to be kind to yourself before determining your next steps.Ask yourself the following questions through a objective point of view:

    – Were you fully satisfied with how you conducted the session?
    – How do you feel about your performance?
    – Did you feel unfulfilled or lacking in any way? Where is that coming from?

It’s best practice to engage a coach supervisor or mentor with whom you can discuss these with and process beyond any self-limiting structures, to support you in your coach development.

Conclusion

Again, coaching is a deeply personal profession, in that you put in so much of yourself to serve your clients to your best availability, that it’s hard to keep yourself subjective. This, in turn, affects how you view success.

In order to determine if a session is successful or not, you have to create your own definition of success. Reflect on what would be fair and objective ways to benchmark your coaching so that it’s not based on how you feel.

Invest session time in thoroughly understanding what success means to a client, so that it’s not just a touch-and-go conversation. This way, when you can separate yourself from your client more, you are in control and empowered to step into your power.

Don’t be too hard on yourself. Be patient and take it one step at a time.


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February 24, 2020by collective-admin

If you are still having trouble getting your resolutions to stick, check out the full transcript of the conversation our Director of Training, Lin Tan had when she went on air with CNA938 just before the New Year! We’ve highlighted all of Lin’s tips and advice and we hope you enjoy the fun interview below!

Yasmin Jonkers:

All right, listen. You want to make all these resolutions, but are you actually going to stick to them? We have Lin Tan with us, Master Certified Coach with the International Coach Federation and senior coach and trainer at CCI with us. How many things do you coach my dear? Good morning, Lin.

Lin Tan:

Good morning, Yasmin. Good morning, Arnold.

Yasmin Jonkers:

How are you? You’re very busy. Do you make new year resolutions?

Lin Tan:

I do resolutions all the time, not only during new year.

Arnold Gay:

Are you successful all the time as well?

Lin Tan:

When I feel like it, when I feel like something different needs to happen. Am I successful? I choose the ones that I know that really mean something to me.

Arnold Gay:

So you’re realistic and also they have to motivate you, I suppose.

Lin Tan:

They have to resonate.

Arnold Gay:

Okay. What’s your latest resolution then?

Lin Tan:

To get back into shape.

Yasmin Jonkers:

Hey, you just heard her and you’re asking this question. This is a little intrusive.

Arnold Gay:

You didn’t have to tell me the most personal ones. To get back into shape? You look fine, but okay, that’s a good goal.

Yasmin Jonkers:

You’re a very beautiful woman.

Lin Tan:

Because I just gave birth eight months ago and we kind of get out of shape after we give birth.

Arnold Gay:

So I hear.

Yasmin Jonkers:

I wouldn’t have known. Okay. So why do we make resolutions in the year Lin?

Lin Tan:

I think it’s along the line of-

Yasmin Jonkers:

Of a myth?

Arnold Gay:

Just remember, Yasmin is a skeptic, okay?

Lin Tan:

So, put aside a knee jerk reaction to New Year resolutions. It pretty much reflects how human beings are always on a path of change, right? We always are wired to look for something new, something different, something more exciting. We’re in our comfort zone all the time but we’re always looking out. And that’s kind of why we decide to set a resolution or a wish or a desire or a goal, many different terms.

Arnold Gay:

So can you get too comfortable in your comfort zone such that you don’t want to make new year resolutions?

Lin Tan:

It’s possible I think.

Yasmin Jonkers:

He’s implying I don’t improve ever.

Arnold Gay:

Okay, so a desire for change, but I want to bring the point you made as well, how you have to be realistic, how it has to resonate. So I would assume that this varies from individual to individual, right? So what will be the first step if you want to make a New Year resolution?

Lin Tan:

Well, to look within. A lot of times, we set goals around what we should be doing. Like, I should manage my money better, I should lose weight, I should get a new job or finally get a new job. I should, I should, I should. So, there’s a lot of ‘shoulds’ and that’s almost like what I think I’m expected to have or to be, it’s almost like ‘outside-in’ goals.

Arnold Gay:

So in a way, it’s public and it’s a bit of peer pressure in a way as well, yeah?

Lin Tan:

Yeah. Society pressure to fit in, but then if we want something that really sticks, we should look from within, what really means something to me. Like, if I had to spend the next one year really working on this, what would that one thing be? So, people can sometimes be quite ambitious. I want to do or change five different things. Just choose one really important thing.

Arnold Gay:

Okay. Is there any particular reason why the new year is the time that people do this? You just said basically you do it all year round, but new year seems to be the most popular.

Yasmin Jonkers:

It’s the fashion magazines telling you to do this.

Arnold Gay:

Is that really?

Yasmin Jonkers:

Yeah, it’s because you’re told, right?

Lin Tan:

I think it’s just become that way and then people fall into this expectation that, “Oh, it’s New Year, I need to set something.“ But then again, I guess people are just more excited about what the next year could be. How do I use this opportunity to maybe inspire myself or motivate myself to look for something different?

Yasmin Jonkers:

Quite like this. So I’m thinking, if we turn our resolutions, is it a problem with being too lofty, and that’s the reason why we don’t tend to keep our resolution possible?

Lin Tan:

We’ve got to-

Yasmin Jonkers:

Like you say, look deep inside and tone it down a little bit.

Lin Tan:

Yes. Aligning it to a value would help. So, for example, if I want to lose weight because I want to look good, I want to fit into a dress, that may not be strong enough because when the going gets rough, hey, I’d rather say go have dinner with my friends.

Yasmin Jonkers:

And then you’ve just had a child. What if you said I want to be a better mom? What is the metric to measure what a better mom is?

Lin Tan:

You nailed it, right? It’s about what it means for you. Maybe it’s about being a better parent, maybe it’s about integrity to my body. So, it’s a value that you attach to the goal and when you do that, when it gets tough, you know what you’re doing this for. It’s less of the outcome, more of the change within.

Arnold Gay:

So it’s intrinsic?

Lin Tan:

Yes.

Arnold Gay:

As opposed to public pressure?

Lin Tan:

Yeah. Or numbers like, “Okay, if I drop 8kg I’m successful.“ But sometimes we can get there faster without feeling like we earned it, and then we feel like, “Ah, man.“ We could actually lose 4kg out of 8kg but we worked really hard and it’s the intrinsic change that then makes us feel like, hey, I-

Arnold Gay:

So it has to be driven internally, I get that point. But even so, when you do something like that, you must have some points along the journey that you say, “Oh, this is just not worth it“, right? So what advice would you give to someone who wants to stick to it, but will come across moments of weakness and will feel as though he or she will want to give up.

Lin Tan:

Yeah. It’s all in the planning or the dreaming phase before that. So when you set a goal, you have to bear in mind two things are going to happen, disruptions and distractions. And when you set your goal up with that in mind, you’re almost sort of preparing yourself that this is what’s going to happen, but is this important enough for me to stick to? So it would be a trap or people fall into the trap of ‘I want to set up a goal’, but then they disregard all these external circumstance circumstances that are bound to come in.

Yasmin Jonkers:

Okay. Apart from the double Ds of disruption and distraction, would it help to physically put up reminders like in your car, use post-its and things like that, white board.

Lin Tan:

Yes. And telling your friends, your colleagues, your bosses, your parents, your kids.

Yasmin Jonkers:

So there’s a shame factor. Some people are negatively motivated.

Arnold Gay:

Yeah, I suppose that’s right. So this suggests as well, that you could have a partner in terms of making new year resolutions. So the both of you want to lose weight, the both of you want to look better.

Yasmin Jonkers:

You can team up with Lin. Both of you want to do gym stuff, right?

Arnold Gay:

Yeah, it works for me, you want to bodybuild? My new year resolution is to join the Mr. Universe contest.

Yasmin Jonkers:

Because Arnie Gay is going to turn to Arnie Schwarzenegger at some point, that’s the plan.

Arnold Gay:

That’s a good example of a totally unrealistic and not really intrinsically driven goal or resolution.

Yasmin Jonkers:

I have a question for you Lin Tan, who’s the master certified coach and coach of all coaches. Tell us about the people who come to you towards the end of the year and try to broach this subject of new year resolutions.

Arnold Gay:

Do you have clients who actually do that? Hey Lin, I want to hire you-

Yasmin Jonkers:

He’s fishing.

Arnold Gay:

Help me stick to my new year resolution.

Lin Tan:

They don’t phrase it that way but yeah, anybody who comes to coaches are looking for some kind of change.

Yasmin Jonkers:

Okay. What are their main concerns about new year resolutions and do they sort of still believe they have to make them?

Lin Tan:

I think the people who look for coaches are already driven to a certain degree. Maybe it’s around just choosing the right goal or doing it right.

Arnold Gay:

So out of 10 clients that you have, how many have been unrealistic and you’ve had to help them adjust their goals?

Lin Tan:

Always.

Arnold Gay:

Always? Every single one?

Yasmin Jonkers:

I want to be like Sharon Stone and get a date on Bumble.

Lin Tan:

Because when we set up a goal, we’re not in it yet, right? We haven’t achieved it yet. So we can only guess. We can only estimate. We can only say this is the plan, this is what it could look like. But when you’re in the thick of things, you have new data, you have new information and then you might need to pivot. So maybe tightening it a little bit or spacing it out.

Arnold Gay:

So what’s the most unrealistic goal that you had to dissuade your clients from taking up?

Yasmin Jonkers:

Trying to get Sharon Stone on a date via Bumble.

Lin Tan:

Wanting to earn a million dollars.

Arnold Gay:

Three years without having ever set up a business. Where’s the money going to come from?

Yasmin Jonkers:

Ouch. Even I feel pain hearing that resolution. I am so happy we get to meet you on the final day of 2019, thank you for being here in the studio with us. Lin Tan is a Master Certified Coach with the International Coach Federation, ICF-

Arnold Gay:

So you’re going to make a resolution now?

Yasmin Jonkers:

… and senior coach and trainer at CCI. I don’t know, I mean I’ve got her number, right?

Arnold Gay:

What do you do with clients like that?

Lin Tan:

Have longer conversations.

Arnold Gay:

Have longer conversations.

Yasmin Jonkers:

Happy new year, Lin.

Lin Tan:

Thank you. Happy new year.


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February 24, 2020by collective-admin

John has been in the corporate world for over three decades; two-thirds of which he spent at one of the largest technology companies in the world – Microsoft. However, in 2017, he decided to step onto the path of entrepreneurship and strike out on his own as an independent coach and consultant. Describing himself as an “aggressive learner”, John is always on a continuous journey of deep, personal development.


Hey John, I’m excited to start, so let’s begin! What are some of the significant personal/professional changes in your life since PCD?

I would describe my experience as a complete three-dimensional shift in who I am as a person entirely – as a coach, a family man & a businessman. I feel like I am not only changing my life, but also the lives of those I come in contact with. I am now more present, objective and unassuming.

You know, I was especially moved when the people I hold dearest acknowledged my growth.

My partner said: “You are such a great coach. Can you always be a coach? It’s so good for me, for the children.”

My son said, “You are so different now. You are really listening so much more.”

That went straight to my heart. I am grateful.


What was the biggest/most important lesson you learned about yourself after learning/practising coaching?

I think I really understood why it is so important for a coach to both coach and get coached. Practising what you learn during any program is so very powerful and important, especially if a program builds that element into the entire experience.


What are some challenges you are experiencing in your life right now and how are you working on them?

I feel like I am still figuring out what ‘type’ of coach I want to be. Also, it does get a little lonely at times as I am trying to build up my business. However, I find that I am able to coach myself and apply what I have learned on myself. Self-coaching, if you would call it.


What advice would you give to someone who is considering taking on coaching as a skill for themselves?

Be very clear why you are doing it. Learn and practise, learn and practise, learn and practise. I cannot stress that enough. There’s really no excuse, because the content is only as good as your follow-up. If you don’t do it, it gets lost.


What are some of the exciting plans you have for yourself in the near future?

I really love being an executive coach because we get a chance to enable people to clearly see themselves and tap into their hidden potentials and strengths. This impacts not only their professional lives, but it’s the transformation is in its totality – mind and body. I started Pepperminted three years ago – it is a concierge spa service and what’s interesting is our pool of clients include enterprises who are consciously encouraging self-care in their corporate philosophy.

People can also learn more about our executive coaching services www.thejohnnielsen.com and if you are keen to foster self-care and integrate wellness into your personal and corporate life, contact us at www.pepperminted.com.sg.




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February 24, 2020by collective-admin

Mai had been a marketing maven in the corporate world for most of her working life. However, when she saw herself having to move, work, and live in different countries more frequently, a new idea began to take root in her mind. She decided to take the leap and embark on her journey of entrepreneurship by setting up her own coaching practice – MAI LIFE COACH.


Hi Mai, it’s been a pretty long while since we last chatted. We’re quite excited to have this chance to catch up with you! So, what are some of the significant personal/professional changes in your life since PCD?

I would say the biggest change was both a professional and personal one – becoming a business owner. Grabbing hold of that momentum during and after the course to fuel my building of my coaching practice has been a very exciting, insightful and fulfilling process.


What was the biggest/most important lesson you learned about yourself after learning/practising coaching?

It’s hard to say what was ‘biggest’ or ‘most important’. I think if I had to highlight something, it would have to be my personal level of self-awareness, which increased so much. I see how I have stopped second-guessing others and I am now more objective and calmer when I interact with people.


What are some challenges you are experiencing in your life right now and how are you working on them?

Right now, I would say it’s about increasing the marketing efforts of my coaching practice. I have signed up for a marketing program that should be able to support me as I roll out my different strategies.


What advice would you give to someone who is considering taking on coaching as a skill for themselves?

I would say you should take stock and then take advantage of the resources you have to support you; especially if you are planning to start a business. For example, I made sure I used the drive naturally generated by being part of the PCD program back then to really push me to register and launch my business.


What are some of the exciting plans you have for yourself in the near future?

I will be focussing on my ‘expat coaching’ service to help expatriates and/or partners who might need support settling into a new country.




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November 26, 2019by collective-admin

Prior to joining the Professional Coach Development (PCD) Program, Vanessa was a Gallery Administrator in a tertiary institute – a job that allowed her to be in a space which aligned with her love for the creative arts. She also majored in Psychology because of her keen interest and love of understanding and working with people. After receiving her Associated Credited Coach (ACC) credential from the International Coach Federation (ICF), she has combined both of her passions in a coaching business that fuses art therapy and coaching. We catch up with her in this interview.


Hi Vanessa, thanks for the opportunity to speak with you! What are some of the significant personal/professional changes in your life since PCD?

I would say the most significant change is my leaving my job and starting my own business – The Peace Catcher. Prior to PCD, I was already interested in art therapy, but PCD provided a means for me to obtain practical skills that complemented my art therapy knowledge. I would say this business is the manifestation of both my artistic/creative side and my desire to help people through art and coaching.


What was the biggest/most important lesson you learned about yourself after learning/practising coaching?

I know a lot of people have said this, but I truly feel that one big lesson was about believing in myself. I actually learned that for a good part of my life, I was suffering from something called ‘selective mutism’, but I always brushed it off and chalked it up to my being introverted. Through coaching, I actually gained the self-awareness to recognise my situation and learned how to externalise my ‘inner voice’ in a way to help others. I saw the value of what I could bring to the table, especially when I see clients connect their ‘dots’ for themselves and create their own ‘ah ha’ moments.


What are some challenges you are experiencing in your life right now and how are you working on them?

Since starting the business, I realise that it’s challenging to get people to be open-minded about art. A lot of people actually limit themselves – I hear things like ‘I can’t draw’ or ‘I have no talent’ or ‘my drawing is so ugly’ all the time. What I have found is that coaching combines well with art therapy because it gives a structure that make the experience less intimidating. My knowledge of both art therapy and coaching actually helps bridge the self-limiting conversations people have around art.


What advice would you give to someone who is considering taking on coaching as a skill for themselves?

I would say to trust your intuition. I knew I needed to change something in my life, but I was sitting on the fence for the longest time. Signing up for PCD actually opened up a lot of opportunities and possibilities for me. I would even go as far to say that I found my life purpose through coaching. If you are already thinking about it, your intuition is probably telling you something.


What are some of the exciting plans you have for yourself in the near future?

Haha, I am hard at work trying to build my dream of becoming a digital nomad. The Peace Catcher is just the first step. I am still creating art as well as conducting consultations for clients who are looking to art therapy as a way to help them unlock their hidden potential.